Winter Preserving: Marmellata di Limone e Pomodori (Lemon & Tomato Marmalade)

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As I mentioned a few days ago, I am doing the Food In Jars Year-long Mastery Challenge #FIJchallenge. This month’s challenge was Marmalade which I have never made before, so I was excited to try it. I thought about doing good ole’ orange marmalade, so I could use it in next years “cuccidati” Christmas cookies, but that didn’t really excite me. I turned to my new fav canning book Preserving Italy by Domenica Marchetti and found a recipe for a Tomato Marmalade that I wanted to try (this recipe is on her website, noted below). There wasn’t that much lemon in the recipe and it didn’t use the whole fruit, just the zest, so I felt like I wouldn’t be getting the true Marmalade experience; I revised the recipe to incorporate all of the lemon, so my version has a more dominate lemon flavor than tomato. I also found some nice organic Meyer lemons at Trader Joes, so that was my main citrus for the marmalade. This recipe didn’t follow the true marmalade formula; 1 part fruit, 1 part sugar, 1 part liquid/water, actually it didn’t have any water at all. Because of this I was concerned about the acid content, especially when canning tomatoes. What I did was, probably over-kill, added the juice of 2 regular lemons. It took about an hour and a half of gentle, yet lively boiling for the marmalade to set, which is what I expected, but set it did; I like the consistency.

I’m pleased with my first venture into marmalade making; this marmalade is sweet but also savory. It goes very nice with cheese and I could also see it pairing wonderfully as a condiment or a glaze for seafood or chicken. Here’s how I made it:

Lemon & Tomato Marmalade or Marmellata di Limone e Pomodori Adapted from Domenica Marchetti’s “Marmellata di Pomodori” (www.DomenicaCooks.com).

• 4 pounds ripe plum tomatoes, washed
• 2 cups sugar
• 1 pound Meyer Lemons – zest peeled into strips, white pith removed and then segmented and seeded
• Juice of 2 large regular lemons
• 2 tablespoons good balsamic vinegar
• 2 teaspoon sea salt
• 8 whole cloves
• 2 bay leaves
• 2 jalapeno or chile peppers, seeded and minced

Cut the stem end from the tomatoes. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the skin from the tomatoes. Cut the tomatoes in half and remove the seeds. Cut the tomatoes into chunks and add to a heavy non-reactive pot.

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Add the rest of the ingredients to the pot with the tomatoes, give it a stir. Over medium heat, bring the pot to a simmer.

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Cook at a lively simmer for about 1 ½ hours until the marmalade is thick and glossy and set, stirring often to prevent the marmalade from burning, this is most important towards the end of the cooking time, as the marmalade can go from perfectly set to a burnt mess pretty quickly.

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Carefully fish out the bay leaves and cloves, discard. Spoon the marmalade into sterilized jars and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes. If you don’t want to process the jars you can refrigerate for at least a month.

This will make a small batch of 3 8-ounce or 6 4-ounce jars.

 

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Winter Preserving: Marmellata di Limone e Pomodori (Lemon & Tomato Marmalade)

• 4 pounds ripe plum tomatoes, washed
• 2 cups sugar
• 1 pound Meyer Lemons – zest peeled into strips, white pith removed and then segmented and seeded
• Juice of 2 large regular lemons
• 2 tablespoons good balsamic vinegar
• 2 teaspoon sea salt
• 8 whole cloves
• 2 bay leaves
• 2 jalapeno or chile peppers, seeded and minced

Cut the stem end from the tomatoes. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the skin from the tomatoes. Cut the tomatoes in half and remove the seeds. Cut the tomatoes into chunks and add to a heavy non-reactive pot. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pot with the tomatoes, give it a stir. Over medium heat, bring the pot to a simmer. Cook at a lively simmer for about 1 ½ hours until the marmalade is thick and glossy and set, stirring often to prevent the marmalade from burning, this is most important towards the end of the cooking time, as the marmalade can go from perfectly set to a burnt mess pretty quickly.

Carefully fish out the bay leaves and cloves, discard. Spoon the marmalade into sterilized jars and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes. If you don’t want to process the jars you can refrigerate for at least a month.

This will make a small batch of 3 8-ounce or 6 4-ounce jars.

#FIJChallenge #Preserving #Marmalade

 

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